Rust Audio

Urgent / time-sensitive: Netlify team plan & Code of Conduct

Two discussion points created here: https://github.com/orgs/RustAudio/teams/admins for further awareness, one for Netlify and one for Code of Conduct.

Pasting the messages here as well, for more awareness:


We’ve had a https://netlify.com open source team account. This has been used for https://areweaudioyet.com and was planned to be used for https://rust.audio. Netlify was chosen because (among other reasons)

  • websites are written using Zola, and e.g. GitHub pages only supports Jekyll, or building locally & pushing built content to a static dir or branch, or writing your own custom GH actions to do that
  • netlify team account lets us give multiple people access to the things, compared to e.g. running from a single person’s personal account
  • netlify gives us build previews for the PRs

Netlify is asking users to re-apply for the open source plan (screenshots below).

This requires us to:

  • have a code of conduct
  • mention a license

Former is difficult, because we don’t have one decided for the group yet. See the other discussion created in this GitHub Discussions list.

Latter is difficult, because different projects under our repository could be using different licenses. One possibility could be to just select one license (e.g. one used by the website) and tell more in the free text field.

This has a hard deadline of March 16 2020.

I see two options:

  • Figure out the requirements and re-apply for the team plan, OR
  • Remove the current team plan
    • host the areweaudioyet.com site elsewhere
    • make sure the rust.audio site that is currently hosted on some other user’s plan continues working in some other way as well


We should probably consider adopting a code of conduct for the group.

One good solution could be to adopt the Rust Code of Conduct as specified here https://www.rust-lang.org/policies/code-of-conduct

Any thoughts / comments / concerns?


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One thread found here about CoC: Contribution guide and/or code of conduct?

Concerning the code of conduct: I think we can simply choose the same code of conduct as the Rust language. Just my two cents, here.

Concerning licensing: this is a more tough question. Our Netlify account is not just for one open source project and the different projects can have different licenses. On top of that, the most common is probably MIT OR Apache 2.0, which is not in Netlify’s list, which is much more restrictive than the list of OSI approved licenses (but, in contrast to the fill in form, in their prosa, Netlify states that an OSI approved license is enough).

-> I would reach out to Netlify and ask advice on how to proceed with the licensing (if possible).
-> I’m not entirely sure – I don’t follow Netlify closely – but Netlify may be steering away from their free accounts. Also note that “For Free Usage Tier Customers, the Services may be terminated by either Netlify or Customer, without cause, immediately upon notice.” and “[…] we reserve the right to disable or remove any website project on Netlify’s Free Usage Tier without notice at our sole discretion”, so I think it’s a good idea anyway to look at an alternative/back-up plan.

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I haven’t followed Netlify either (I didn’t even know that the websites are hosted by them), but from my point of view, this very much sounds like they try to move away from free Open Source Accounts. They don’t advertise them on their pricing page and the fact that we have to reapply for the program pretty much feels like they want to get rid of some, maybe many projects.

On the other hand, I don’t feel like these websites are that necessary: areweaudioyet.com only contains a small list of some projects you can also find by googling and also doesn’t really answer the question “Are we audio yet?”, it just lists some projects. rust.audio is also very incomplete and hasn’t been updated for ages. I like the idea of having a central blog that tells others what is going on with the project, but no one does that.

Therefore, I would personally cancel the plan and take the websites down until some finds the inspiration to do something with them.

This also makes sense, I think.

Copypasting what I also commented here


I have now gone ahead and deleted the RustAudio Netlify team to remove this part of the equation. If we want, we can continue thinking about the CoC separately from that.

Rationale: even if we had planned to use it for some things, it wasn’t actually used yet by anything other than a relatively useless areweaudioyet page created by me. The main rust.audio website hadn’t been moved to that org yet. If we want to get back on Netlify, we can always re-apply later, so this is not an irreversible action either.

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